Decluttering 101: The Wardrobe Edit

Hi, loves! A few weeks ago Matt was working all weekend and I took a whole day to clear the heck out of the wardrobes. When he left for work I immediately pulled out a whole rail of clothing so I couldn’t decide not to do it, and the second he got home from work I rushed him upstairs to see all my hard work, ha! I owned so many clothes, but not many brought me joy, and I was feeling a little deflated every time I looked in my wardrobes to try put an outfit together. Matt is so good at buying high quality items he loves that last him for years, and up until the past year that wasn’t something I did. I bought any old junk just because I thought it would come in handy and I also had some weird emotional attachment to my old clothing. Realistically I had a wall of wardrobes full to the brim, yet I constantly felt like I had nothing to wear. I shop smarter now but I really needed a clear canvas to work with; I just wanted to love everything I owned and so decided a major purge was on the cards!

I feel SO GOOD now about getting ready in the mornings or evenings, and I’m so happy I decided to bite the bullet and spend six hours – yes, really – working on this. Putting outfits together is way more fun (and easier), and I know what gaps I have in my wardrobe for things to purchase moving into Autumn, so my shopping list has pretty much wrote itself. I may have already began purchasing my Autumn clothing… I’m just so excited! My wardrobes look so much better and are properly organised, and Matt has a little more room now too which makes me so happy. Hopefully in the next year or so we’ll have our own house but for now we’re so happy and grateful with our set up; for anyone that doesn’t know we live between our family houses whilst we save for our own home. Matt and I know how lucky we are to be able to do this; we get to be together every night – which is just the best thing, I love him so much! – and our family’s love having us there with them, (or so they tell us, haha). We tend to spend more evenings at my family’s house due to Matt’s shifts, so I really wanted to make more space for Matt in our wardrobes. In this post I’m sharing my recommended tips and tricks for a major declutter, but where to start? First of all, turn on Netflix to watch all of Tidying Up With Marie Kondo. Then read this blog post on why I love her so much. Then, you’re about ready to go:

Clear out one section at a time
This is the only thing I disagree with in Marie Kondo’s teachings. She advises to dump out everything in one go, but I feel like that’s a little too overwhelming for me personally, and I’d rather be able to take a break if/when needed; I don’t think a clear out has to be done in one sitting if you don’t want to. I think it’s better to look at your clothing in one category at a time, maybe even sub-categories depending how much you own, as I find it easier to focus on one thing at a time. (I don’t know why because in regular everyday life I’m doing thirty things at once!) I also like this method because I prefer to re-organise where things are kept as I go; this time I put all of my t-shirts, short sleeves, camis etc high up in my wardrobe, and moved long sleeved t-shirts, blouses, thin knit sweaters etc to the bottom. It’s easier to place things in your wardrobe in a way that makes sense to you as you’re getting dressed or picking outfits out to pack, and once you start the process it becomes much easier.

Clean out all shelving, drawers and rails as you go
Do not leave ANYTHING in your wardrobe as you clear out. Nothing at all. You might know you love that plaid shirt you always wear or the grey jumper you just bought, but you still need to see each piece to make sure you’re keeping only things you love. If you have similar clothing pieces – how many white blouses does one gal need? – this is also a good time to cull the ones you don’t reach for very often. I also take the time whilst everything is off the shelf, out of the drawer or off the rail to fully clean and wipe down. Method’s all purpose cleaner is brilliant for this, I’m still obsessed with the Wild Rhubarb scent!

Make three piles per category: donate, keep and sell
The one basic of a wardobe clear out is always to make these three piles, right? This is also great when you’re working by category (or, sub category if you’re super type A *raises hand*) as you can put away your keep piles as you go, and organise your donating/selling piles easier.

Identify any items you feel like your wardrobe is missing
Maybe you are changing your style up, maybe you’ve thrown out or donated all of your jeans because you realised you didn’t like any, or maybe you just realised a few basics that were missing from your wardrobe, but take this as the opportunitory to take inventory. As I mentioned in this post, I found a few obvious gaps where I was lacking in my wardrobe and made a list (of course, I LOVE a list) of things to pick up over the next few months. This makes it much easier when shopping, as you begin to shop intentionally and to choose things that go with what you already own.

Be ruthless: if it doesn’t bring you joy you don’t need it
I used to be very sentimental with my clothes but I’m really not anymore, I feel like if it doesn’t benefit me and I don’t feel good wearing it there’s no need to keep it anymore. Goodbye, size 6 jeans. I think a really good rule of thumb for this is asking yourself “if you were shopping in a store right now, would you buy X?” If the answer is no, you don’t need it in your wardrobe because it obviously doesn’t bring you joy. Also, do not keep hold of items that once fit you but now don’t! It will make you miserable seeing them every day, life’s just too short.

Give every item a home
One of the biggest problems I found with my wardobes being messy is that not everything had it’s own home, therefore when things were ‘out of place’ there was nowhere for them to go. Storage bins are great for miscellaneous items that are otherwise hard to store, like scarves! I rolled all of my scarves and stores them in a storage bin which means I can see them all at a glance and pick one out so much easier.

Remove seasonal pieces that won’t be worn in the next six months
If you don’t have a lot of space in your wardrobe(s), then you need to make sure you utilise it wisely. If you still struggle for space after your clear out, I’d recommend storing your Spring/Summer specific clothing during the Autumn/Winter months, and vice versa, to limit your wardrobe looking like a clothing explosion. If you have underbed storage or a loft, that will probaly work best. Buy large sealable bins to make sure your clothes don’t get damp in a loft space, just make sure you don’t forget they’re there. I actually no longer need to do this as I have enough space to store everything at once since my clear out which makes me very happy!

Maintain your organisation
Consistency is key, after all. As tempting as it can sometimes be to say you’ll put your clean clothes away at a later date/time, just do it there and then. You worked hard to clear everything out, and you owe it to yourself to maintain your efforts. It also takes literally five minutes, so you have no excuse! Having a ‘one in, one out’ system when buying new items is a great way to ensure you don’t need to have a clear out of the same scale again, but I’d definitley recommend reviewing your wardrobe every 3-6 months to make tweaks here and there.

Now… relax. Grab a cup of tea. Admire your hard work!

Thank you so much for reading! I hope you found this post helpful and are able to completely clean out your wardrobes too. I feel like that ~fresh~ feeling everyone gets in January is something I feel in Autumn, and this year I’m so ready for it. We’re making a start on Matt’s wardrobes and drawers in the next week or two and I’m so excited, it’s way more fun to be brutal with the ‘donate’ and ‘sell’ piles of someone else’s clothes 🙂 for real though, it feels so good to be organised and to love everything in my wardrobe again. I literally found so many pieces of clothing I forgot I owned, how is that even possible?! Do you need a wardrobe declutter too? Is there any extra tips you have to share with me and my readers? Please leave them below!

-G x

Learning To Shop Consciously

Hi, loves! I’ve wrote several posts about wanting to reduce my carbon footprint, learning to be more sustainable and all of the reasons why we shouldn’t shop fast fashion trends, but is it wrong to still enjoy shopping for new items and even having the ocassional splurge? In October 2018 I wrote about why I was changing the way I shopped, and it caused me to re-evaluate what I’m buying; from food to fashion and everything else. In this post I focused more on the fashion aspect of sustainability; talking about all of the ways to minimize buying, give your old clothes a new lease of life, and to encourage donating things that didn’t serve you a purpose anymore, but how do we go about shopping for new pieces?

I personally think that sustainability within fashion is a complete grey area; many people have said they’ll never ever buy new pieces of clothing again and will only up-cycle current clothes, borrow/rent or shop second hand. Others, like me, do our bit where we can with donating, buying second hand and trying to shop more consciously when buying new. For me personally, I think the key is balance; just like recycling and cutting down on single use plastic, everyone doing their bit makes such a huge difference. In the months since I wrote the above post on fast fashion, I’ve seen SO much more attention brought to it, and I feel like lots of us are a little overwhelmed. I love a bit of retail therapy, and in recent months I’ve began to find my personal style and learn to love my body (I’m working on it, anyway) so I’m all for buying new pieces here and there. I also really want to share more fashion related content on my blog; it’s something I’ve always shied away from because there is so much hype around it, but I hope the Autumn months are going to see an influx of fashion related content around here. Here’s how I’m shopping more consciously, and I hope it helps you too!

Do not purchase on a whim. I’d say that at least 90% of items I’ve purchased on a whim because I ‘needed’ to buy something, bought a whacky print that isn’t me or liked how it looked on the model without giving consideration to how it would fit me are items I regret buying. I try to buy seasonally now; items that will see me through a whole season (or multiple seasons) and can be worn in many different ways are ones that stay in my wardrobe for years, and I truly get the value from. Buying with the purpose of that clothing item lasting you through all different seasons and occasions is something that has changed the way I shop in such a huge way; I’m way less likely to be drawn to things I won’t wear over and over again. I really try not to impulse buy, and generally prefer to shop in store rather than online because it’s best to feel fabrics and try things on.

Buy quality over quantity. I’m not saying you have to spend hundreds of pounds on an outfit or piece of clothing to justify it being ‘good’ quality, but it really can pay to shop arounds sometimes. For example, buying cheap t-shirts from Primark might seem like fun in the heat of the moment, but realistically you’re not going to get much wear out of it and it’ll end up in a charity bag within a matter of weeks. Factor in that someone had to make that t-shirt; if they’re marking up their price to be still be £5 or less, it cost pennies to make, and in reflection the person who made that was likely not being paid a fair wage. The fabrics and dyes used in ‘cheap’ clothing are terrible for the environment, and you just don’t get value for money. Aim to shop in stores that offer more premium priced items that are made with better materials, as they will last you way longer and you’ll get your value for money. I’ve said this a few times, but Matt is so good for shopping with the quality over quantity in mind, and I’m slowly but surely learning from him!

Know your price point and stick to your budget. Hand in hand with looking at quality over quantity, it’s so important to know what you can afford, and where you can compromise on spending a little more for a better piece, or go for a less expensive option that suits your needs but still fits with your ethical opinion. It’s hard to judge this as everyone is so different, and our allocated money to spend on clothing each month can vary so much. I personally will never feel guilty for buying at *a certain store* because the reality is I can’t afford to shop exclusively at ethical, sustainable stores or brands. The prices are much higher – although I agree with the reasoning for this, for paying fair wages and using harder to source fabrics – but I’m unable to consistently purchase that way at this time in my life.

Buy with intention. Does the item of clothing go with at least X amount of things you own? Can you wear it through multiple seasons/years? Or is it a ‘trendy’ piece that you’ll not reach for in a month? Or are you only buying it because everyone else is wearing it? Yes, I’m talking about *that* Zara dress. If the answers to these questions err on the side of ~I am not shopping for the right reason~ then chances are, it’s a purchase you’ll regret making. As I said in this post, I read somewhere that you should get at least thirty wears out of each piece of clothing you own, although I think personally that number should be even higher. Buying items of clothing that are not made to fit a certain trend makes this much more likely; stick to shapes and fits that flatter your body, buy solid coloured basics, opt for pieces that can be dressed up or down and only buy patterns when it’s one you know you’ll wear long term (like leopard print, always buy leopard print).

Get over the fear of outfit repeating. I’m sure most of us are immediately re-playing that scene from Lizzie McGuire in our heads right now, which taught us that re-wearing clothes you love was so not cool. Well, you know what really isn’t cool? Killing our planet by throwing away billions of clothing each year. This article shocked me so much, I can’t believe there is still such a stigma against wearing clothes you love, and it bugs me that we’re taught to think this way. I regularly see Daily Mail articles with headlines like “Princess Kate recycles dress for another event” …what? She is not ‘recycling’ anything. She’s literally wearing her clothes. Why don’t we all take a leaf out of Kate’s book and wear what we bloody own?! I also sometimes justify higher priced products by looking at the cost per wear; for example if a jumper was £60.00 but you wore it thirty times, you’re down to £2 per wear; making the investment worth it, and the jumper is better quality therefore will last longer with the correct care.

Read the labels. I really am that person who reads the labels on pretty much every clothing item I purchase. I’m not an angel and I definitely could be better with this, but I try to stay away from purchasing man-made fabrics, such as polyester, and opt for more natural fabrics that are sustainable to our planet. There is a term called greenwashing that is being thrown around a lot recently, and it basically means brands are being accused of advertising products/fabrics are ‘better for the environment’ without being able to back it up. So many cotton clothing items say they are made with ‘recycled’ cotton, but many retailers are not being truthful with this statement; if it doesn’t say “certified recycled/sustainable cotton” it’s more than likely NOT. Do your research, check the labels thoroughly and be prepared to shop around.

Buy with comfort in mind. This one is maybe something that lots of you won’t agree with, but I am tired of buying clothing items that LOOK good, but don’t feel good. Super tight skinny jeans, I’m looking at you. Now don’t get me wrong, I love a good pair of skinnies as much as the next person, but if Matt and I are heading out for dinner and drinks (hello, bloating!) I’m no longer forcing myself to wear them when it’s just not necessary. Over the past few months I’ve totally fallen in love with Mom jeans, and I couldn’t care less if they make me look ‘big’ which was what I always thought when I tried a pair on. Matt compliments me every single time I wear them, and they’re so much comfier. If you’re still not on the Mom jean hype, please go try them out! I am equally as obsessed with midi skirts, comfy trousers and if I’m having a chilled day you can bet I’m wearing leggings for that athleisure vibe. Comfort is key, and honestly when you’re comfortable in your clothing (and your own skin, but that’s for another post) you look so much better anyway!

I’m so excited to shop for my Autumn wardrobe, and I’m hoping to implement a better one in/one out system when the time comes. I began decluttering my wardrobe last weekend, and over the next few weeks of culling more and more, I’m determined to only own things I love, feel good in and will get wear out of. I can’t wait to begin buying a few Autumn pieces, I’m really so excited to create a wardrobe I love for years to come! My shopping list for Autumn includes chunky cable knit sweaters, a new midi skirt or two in darker tones, black (vegan) leather ankle boots, a good pair of dark wash mom jeans and some comfy long sleeved tees. I’ll definitely be sharing a little Autumn haul on my blog in September or October, and I’d love to share more outfit related posts with you next season if you wouldn’t be fussed that most of my clothes aren’t able to be linked? I adore Autumn fashion, and I’m excited to focus on fashion a little more on my blog.

Thank you so much for reading! I hope you found this post helpful and maybe a little interesting; I love to talk about this topic and I’d love to know your thoughts below. How are you shopping more consciously? Have you seen brands greenwashing potential customers for their own gain? What’s your favourite tip to shop more consciously?

-G x

The Importance Of Being Kind In An Unkind World

Hi, loves! Happy Sunday!

I feel like the world we live in is constantly throwing out negative thing after negative thing; topics such as climate change, natural disasters, illness and pollution are inescapable to anyone who pays attention to the news or even social media. Add in other horrible headlines that we see on a near-daily basis; murders, animal cruelty, sexism and poverty, and it’s no wonder the world struggles to be kind and positive. Now, this blog post is not at all to put a downer on your Sunday, but it’s to show you that in my opinion, one of the best things we can do for ourselves and each other is to be kind.

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I have been thinking a lot recently about the way I act towards others, and the way others act towards me. I really wanted to write a somewhat chatty blog post about this as it’s something I think we can all struggle with sometimes. I know personally if I was having a bad day, I wouldn’t have necessarily thought about how my mood can affect others, but that’s something I’ve really been working on the past few months. I find that my mood is often brought down if someone else is taking their bad mood out on me; if someone is snappy or rude, I feel like it’s contagious and it makes me feel miserable too. However, when someone is kind and friendly towards you, this also has a contagious effect and the smallest thing can make my whole day.

Another thing that has got me thinking about kindness, is After Life, a Netflix show created by Ricky Gervais, who is also the lead character. Matt and I are only five episodes in and I’ve cried seven times already, it’s moving, incredibly sad, witty, and so emotional. The story is based around a man called Tony, who recently lost his wife Lisa to breast cancer, and how this affects him and everyone around him who just want to help. He’s struggling to deal with all of the emotions he feels since her death, and contemplated taking his own life as a result. There are funny parts in there too, and without giving too much away it is a perfect example of the fact you don’t know what other people are going through. Kindness is sometimes the only thing we have, and it’s truly important to spread and share with everyone you meet.

Being kind is honestly one of the best traits in a person in my opinion, and I’m blessed to be surrounded by so many kind-hearted people. I know I talk about my boyfriend approximately 24 hours a day (sorry not sorry), but he’s really just the best thing in my life. He is without a doubt the most hard-working, generous and kind man I’ve ever met, and he makes me so proud. His kindness is endearing; he always wants to help, he makes other people feel good about themselves, and he is such a happy person. He genuinely inspires me to be a better person every day! My mum and dad are so loving and kind; they help anyone in any way they possibly can, and they never expect anything in return for that. My family and close friends are a great bunch of kind-hearted people, and I know how lucky I am to have this kind of inner circle.

This past week I was in Asda picking up our dinner ingredients, and an elderly lady was struggling to reach something on a lower shelf so I grabbed it for her. I didn’t think about it, and I’m sure this is a pretty natural reaction for anyone, of course we’re going to help people when we can, but she was so grateful and happy that I’d done such a simple thing. She stopped to chat for a little while, and explained she had lots of problems with her hip and could no longer do everyday tasks the same way. We spoke for only a few minutes, and when we said goodbye she thanked me for being so kind to her, which naturally made my eyes fill with tears. (I’m a crier, lol). I’d had a long day at work, was feeling a little stressed out and was wishing away the hours until Matt finished work so I could curl up with him. It was a great reminder of how much our actions can directly affect those around us, even people we don’t know, and why being kind should not depend on your mood. I felt so happy to have this little exchange with the lady, and it gave me all the warm fuzzies to see how happy she was from stopping for a quick chat.

Being kind is not exclusive to people of wealth or people without, it’s something inclusive to all and I think it should be a higher priority for people, myself included. Organise your day or week, and make sure to take time out each day to carry out small acts of kindness. Kindness may not always be the most important thing in our lives, we all have different priorities at different times, but I truly think if we all focus a little more on it, the world would be a much better place.

As I said above, kindness can be contagious and that is one of the best things about it in my opinion. How many times have you seen a stranger smile at you, smiled back and instantly felt happier? Or recieved a hug at the end of a long day that just felt like heaven? Or given a gift and seen the joy on someone else’s face? Being kind can be a truly selfless act, of course, but it’s lovely that it has a boomerang-like effect; we get a buzz from making others feel good, and I think that’s pretty special.

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Fifteen Easy Things You Can Do Today To Be More Kind:
Smile. It’s really such a small thing, but how good do you feel when a stranger smiles at you randomly? Or you’re being checked out at the grocery store by a smiley cashier? Be generous with your smiles, they’re free!
Make dinner for your partner. Cooking together is always our preference, but Matt loves when I make dinner for him coming home from work. He sees it as such a nice gesture and I love to do it for him. He repays the favour on his days off when I’m at work and makes dinner for me coming home, I appreciate it so much too.
Donate to a charity. As little as £1 can make a huge differnce to those in need, you don’t have to think big to donate. Whether you’d like to give money, old items you no longer benefit from, canned foods (always needed at the homeless shelters!) or your time, give generously.
Pay for someone’s drink in the line behind you. I love to do this for someone from time to time. It’s so apparent how out-of-the-blue it is, and how flipping happy they are at the prospect of a free drink! You can also try this out at the drive thru, which Matt told me I need to stop doing or people will be following me through like I’m the Pied Piper. LOL.
Look for the best in situations. Being kind to yourself is just as important as being kind to others, and watering your (metaphorical) little garden to help it grow and flourish, is up to you. Don’t get bogged down with whatever is going on in the world whether it’s personal or in general; embrace it, and find the positives. If you look really hard you’ll find some!
Visit with family. They love to see you, and they want to hear about all the stuff you’ve been up to. Matt and I try to visit with our grandmas as much as possible, and we know how much they appreciate that. We see both our families so much and we love it, we’re super family orientated and thrive off quality time spent with them.
Make someone a cuppa. Whether it’s your partner in the morning, your co-workers throughout the day or whilst visiting your mum in the evening, making someone a hot drink is one of the sweetest things you can do. And, very British.
Text a friend and ask how they are. It’s so important to check in with your friends, and it’s something I’m really working on doing more often. I’ve never been great at replying to messages (sorry!) but I’m trying to be intentionally quicker and better at replying, and planning in catch ups.
Let the person behind you with less groceries cut infront. I’ve been allowed to do this so many times as I’m forever popping into Aldi for just a packet of bacon and brioche bread buns (Matt’s fave for a weekend morning, LOL) when people are doing their weekly food shop. I always feel a little awkward pushing in, but it’s a sweet gesture that always makes me smile.
Be thoughtful. Did your boyfriend have a bad day? Does your mum feel poorly? Has your friend been going through something rough? Run them a bath, bring them their favourite treats, or spend a little extra time with them.
Tip good service generously. Matt and I always tip when we receive good service in a restaurant, and I think it’s so important to show gratitude for this. In England it’s a little different than in other countries, as waiters and waitresses get paid a fair wage (generally speaking) so do not ‘rely’ on tips the same way as they do in, for example, the US. It’s not expected here per se, and it’s a lovely treat for someone’s hard work.
Hold the door for the person behind you. One of the most simple gestures you can do for someone but I can’t tell you how much this one can be appreciated.
Leave nice comments on social media. Whether it’s on your friend’s Facebook status or an accquaintance’s Instagram photo, share the love! It takes literally seconds from your day, and it’s always so nice to receive lovely comments. I love receiving blog comments SO much and I’m actively trying to comment more on the blogs I read and love.
Watch whatever your boyfriend wants to watch on TV (without complaining). Who cares if you’ve watched every televised football game for the past three weeks? Who cares if you still have no idea what’s going on in Corrie and you’re hiding from seeing any spoilers? Making sacrifices, as small as watching the football, is so appreciated by your partner, just make sure you get to watch your show next time!
Compliment a stranger. If you like someone’s top, hair cut or just the way they acted towards you (or someone else), tell them!

Thank you so much for reading! I’d love to know your thoughts on kindness in the comments below. What was the last ‘random act of kindness’ someone did for you? Or what did you do for someone else? Do you have to sometimes make a conscious effort to be kind too?

-G x