Decluttering 101: The Wardrobe Edit

Hi, loves! A few weeks ago Matt was working all weekend and I took a whole day to clear the heck out of the wardrobes. When he left for work I immediately pulled out a whole rail of clothing so I couldn’t decide not to do it, and the second he got home from work I rushed him upstairs to see all my hard work, ha! I owned so many clothes, but not many brought me joy, and I was feeling a little deflated every time I looked in my wardrobes to try put an outfit together. Matt is so good at buying high quality items he loves that last him for years, and up until the past year that wasn’t something I did. I bought any old junk just because I thought it would come in handy and I also had some weird emotional attachment to my old clothing. Realistically I had a wall of wardrobes full to the brim, yet I constantly felt like I had nothing to wear. I shop smarter now but I really needed a clear canvas to work with; I just wanted to love everything I owned and so decided a major purge was on the cards!

I feel SO GOOD now about getting ready in the mornings or evenings, and I’m so happy I decided to bite the bullet and spend six hours – yes, really – working on this. Putting outfits together is way more fun (and easier), and I know what gaps I have in my wardrobe for things to purchase moving into Autumn, so my shopping list has pretty much wrote itself. I may have already began purchasing my Autumn clothing… I’m just so excited! My wardrobes look so much better and are properly organised, and Matt has a little more room now too which makes me so happy. Hopefully in the next year or so we’ll have our own house but for now we’re so happy and grateful with our set up; for anyone that doesn’t know we live between our family houses whilst we save for our own home. Matt and I know how lucky we are to be able to do this; we get to be together every night – which is just the best thing, I love him so much! – and our family’s love having us there with them, (or so they tell us, haha). We tend to spend more evenings at my family’s house due to Matt’s shifts, so I really wanted to make more space for Matt in our wardrobes. In this post I’m sharing my recommended tips and tricks for a major declutter, but where to start? First of all, turn on Netflix to watch all of Tidying Up With Marie Kondo. Then read this blog post on why I love her so much. Then, you’re about ready to go:

Clear out one section at a time
This is the only thing I disagree with in Marie Kondo’s teachings. She advises to dump out everything in one go, but I feel like that’s a little too overwhelming for me personally, and I’d rather be able to take a break if/when needed; I don’t think a clear out has to be done in one sitting if you don’t want to. I think it’s better to look at your clothing in one category at a time, maybe even sub-categories depending how much you own, as I find it easier to focus on one thing at a time. (I don’t know why because in regular everyday life I’m doing thirty things at once!) I also like this method because I prefer to re-organise where things are kept as I go; this time I put all of my t-shirts, short sleeves, camis etc high up in my wardrobe, and moved long sleeved t-shirts, blouses, thin knit sweaters etc to the bottom. It’s easier to place things in your wardrobe in a way that makes sense to you as you’re getting dressed or picking outfits out to pack, and once you start the process it becomes much easier.

Clean out all shelving, drawers and rails as you go
Do not leave ANYTHING in your wardrobe as you clear out. Nothing at all. You might know you love that plaid shirt you always wear or the grey jumper you just bought, but you still need to see each piece to make sure you’re keeping only things you love. If you have similar clothing pieces – how many white blouses does one gal need? – this is also a good time to cull the ones you don’t reach for very often. I also take the time whilst everything is off the shelf, out of the drawer or off the rail to fully clean and wipe down. Method’s all purpose cleaner is brilliant for this, I’m still obsessed with the Wild Rhubarb scent!

Make three piles per category: donate, keep and sell
The one basic of a wardobe clear out is always to make these three piles, right? This is also great when you’re working by category (or, sub category if you’re super type A *raises hand*) as you can put away your keep piles as you go, and organise your donating/selling piles easier.

Identify any items you feel like your wardrobe is missing
Maybe you are changing your style up, maybe you’ve thrown out or donated all of your jeans because you realised you didn’t like any, or maybe you just realised a few basics that were missing from your wardrobe, but take this as the opportunitory to take inventory. As I mentioned in this post, I found a few obvious gaps where I was lacking in my wardrobe and made a list (of course, I LOVE a list) of things to pick up over the next few months. This makes it much easier when shopping, as you begin to shop intentionally and to choose things that go with what you already own.

Be ruthless: if it doesn’t bring you joy you don’t need it
I used to be very sentimental with my clothes but I’m really not anymore, I feel like if it doesn’t benefit me and I don’t feel good wearing it there’s no need to keep it anymore. Goodbye, size 6 jeans. I think a really good rule of thumb for this is asking yourself “if you were shopping in a store right now, would you buy X?” If the answer is no, you don’t need it in your wardrobe because it obviously doesn’t bring you joy. Also, do not keep hold of items that once fit you but now don’t! It will make you miserable seeing them every day, life’s just too short.

Give every item a home
One of the biggest problems I found with my wardobes being messy is that not everything had it’s own home, therefore when things were ‘out of place’ there was nowhere for them to go. Storage bins are great for miscellaneous items that are otherwise hard to store, like scarves! I rolled all of my scarves and stores them in a storage bin which means I can see them all at a glance and pick one out so much easier.

Remove seasonal pieces that won’t be worn in the next six months
If you don’t have a lot of space in your wardrobe(s), then you need to make sure you utilise it wisely. If you still struggle for space after your clear out, I’d recommend storing your Spring/Summer specific clothing during the Autumn/Winter months, and vice versa, to limit your wardrobe looking like a clothing explosion. If you have underbed storage or a loft, that will probaly work best. Buy large sealable bins to make sure your clothes don’t get damp in a loft space, just make sure you don’t forget they’re there. I actually no longer need to do this as I have enough space to store everything at once since my clear out which makes me very happy!

Maintain your organisation
Consistency is key, after all. As tempting as it can sometimes be to say you’ll put your clean clothes away at a later date/time, just do it there and then. You worked hard to clear everything out, and you owe it to yourself to maintain your efforts. It also takes literally five minutes, so you have no excuse! Having a ‘one in, one out’ system when buying new items is a great way to ensure you don’t need to have a clear out of the same scale again, but I’d definitley recommend reviewing your wardrobe every 3-6 months to make tweaks here and there.

Now… relax. Grab a cup of tea. Admire your hard work!

Thank you so much for reading! I hope you found this post helpful and are able to completely clean out your wardrobes too. I feel like that ~fresh~ feeling everyone gets in January is something I feel in Autumn, and this year I’m so ready for it. We’re making a start on Matt’s wardrobes and drawers in the next week or two and I’m so excited, it’s way more fun to be brutal with the ‘donate’ and ‘sell’ piles of someone else’s clothes 🙂 for real though, it feels so good to be organised and to love everything in my wardrobe again. I literally found so many pieces of clothing I forgot I owned, how is that even possible?! Do you need a wardrobe declutter too? Is there any extra tips you have to share with me and my readers? Please leave them below!

-G x

What’s The Deal With Fast Fashion?

Happy Wednesday, loves!

I hope you’re all having a wonderful week! This week Matt and I been cooking new recipes and spending our evening’s watching our new Netflix love, Inside The World’s Toughest Prisons. It’s such an interesting show, we’re genuinely shocked at 99% of each episode! I’m so excited for this weekend; Matt and I are spending it attending an NUFC game (our win yesterday made us very happy campers!), having dinner and drinks at our favourite restaurant in the city centre, and hopefully squeezing in a nice long walk down by the beach on Sunday! We’re hoping to KonMari our lives a little more too, it’s a never-ending task! Matt is at a work event on Sunday evening so I’m going to spend a few hours having a serious pamper night before I pick him up, I can’t wait! (Let’s hope the snow forecast is wrong… anyone else terrified at the thought of driving in it or getting stuck? Just me?!) What are you looking forward to this weekend?

*Vanilla chai lattes and vegan Biscoff donuts highly encouraged as the perfect snacks to get you through this post*

Please know I’m definitely not an expert on this topic, and I’m still learning every single day. This post is written based on opinion yet includes facts, all with good intentions, to inform and encourage people to research for themselves.

I have to begin this post by saying a huge thank you to Niomi Smart, Venetia Falconer, Stacey Dooley and Emma Hill for inspiring me to learn about fast fashion, and for setting an amazing example in their everyday lives. One of my favourite Instagram hashtags to search through is #OOOTD (Old Outfit Of The Day) which is something Venetia started to encourage people to shop their wardrobes, and to advocate slow fashion. I’ve shared an OOOTD in this post – Matt took this photo last weekend when we were on our way to brunch!

If you’re a regular reader here on my blog, you’ve definitely seen the words ‘fast fashion’ mentioned a fair few times in recent posts. Fast fashion is quite literal; it’s a term that means clothing pieces created – usually from Designer catwalk inspiration – to be made in large quantities, generally for very little money. On NYE I posted on my Instagram story that I was shopping my wardrobe not the high street for my outfit this year, and that’s a mindset I’m so happy to now have.

Fast fashion is all around us, and us millennials buy in our droves on a daily basis. We’re of course not the only ones to blame for the incredible rise in fast fashion brands’ popularity over the past few years, but we’re certainly not helping the situation. There has been a lot of controversy regarding fast fashion over the past year, which was only heightened by Stacey Dooley’s Fashion’s Dirty Secrets documentary that aired on BBC2 in September 2018. It’s currently unavailable on BBC iPlayer but if you can find it, it’s so worth a watch. As any regular readers will already know, I adore Stacey! She is brilliant at investigating varying topics around the world, and shedding light onto just how serious these topics are. I learned many things from the FDS documentary, and aside from the people directly affected by pollution one of the biggest shocks was that a whole sea in Kazakhstan has almost completely dried up due to the amount of waste produced by surrounding cotton mills. The documentary is eye opening and jaw dropping for us as consumers to watch, and I guarantee it will leave you shocked at your hand in this epidemic too.

So, what is the deal with fast fashion? Is epidemic too strong of a word? Why are we all boycotting it? Basically, it’s killing our planet. It has a detrimental affect on so many factors of life; human rights due to low wages and long hours, water systems due to dye being dumped into rivers and lakes, and the waste and pollution caused by it is getting larger by the day, among many other things. Not only is the process to make the clothes causing pollution on another scale, but the clothes are generally very cheaply made, and they don’t last very long, even if you take care of them. This means often once we are ‘finished’ with these clothing items, they are not able to be passed on – to friends, family or charity – and end up in landfill.

Many brands are now branching into sustainable materials and ethical trading, which includes being able to trace the origins of clothing items right back to where they first started. These companies ensure staff are paid fair wages, have better working conditions and are taking as many procedures as possible to reduce their pollution. Sounds like a great thing, right? Well it is, but those costs have to be passed onto the consumer, and the reality is for most of us we cannot afford to pay X amount of money for everyday items, such as a t-shirt. There’s a weird lull at the moment, in my opinion, as shops seem to be either steered towards fast fashion and the current trend(s) of the season with little to no care for the environment or it’s people, or they’re doing everything they can to be a more ethical brand, and therefore becoming slightly less accessible to customers with higher prices, and less stock available. 

I am a lover of retail therapy, an advocate even, so what am I supposed to do now shopping is considered ‘bad’ for the environment? Well, I can change the way I shop. I covered a lot of the reasons behind why I’m changing the way I shop in this post, but now I’m more determined than ever to be the change I want to see in the world. That’s how all of this starts, right? Some of these tips and ideas will possibly be repeated from previous posts, but they are so important, and if I can bring awareness to just one more person that makes me extremely happy. So, here’s a few things I’m doing, and you can do them too! This applies to all different budgets, and hey if you have the budget to shop only sustainable fashion brands, then more power to you! (And, are there any jobs going at your place?! HAHA).

#OOOTD (LOL posing for photos makes my toes curl, the only one I could include was one of me looking away from the camera, mid hair tuck!)

Donate and shop second hand. I’m very good at the donating part, but I’m yet to shop second hand. Buying from the likes of charity shops, eBay and Depop are a great start as you’re getting new (to you) clothing items at cheaper prices, and it prevents one more ‘new’ garment out finding it’s way out into the world. I sell mine and Matt’s unwanted/unused clothes on eBay fairly often, and since The Great Wardrobe Declutter of 2018 I’ve decluttered several more times. (Marie Kondo’s new Netflix show has encouraged Matt and I to re-assess not just our wardrobes but our whole lives LOL!) Another great alternative would be to gather a few friends and encourage them to go through their clothing, seeing what items they can pass on. Then, you could all get together and exchange a few pieces, giving them a new home and a whole new way to be worn. I’d love to do this!

Shop less, and always with a purpose. I’m embarrassed to admit I used to be that girl that bought a new outfit, or at least a new top, for every social occasion. I mean, I don’t go out that often, but I still purchased way more items than required for my lifestyle. I didn’t necessarily feel like I needed to for myself, but I did think other people would notice. The reality is nobody cares if you take photos wearing the same pieces, and my boyfriend certainly doesn’t take into account what top I’m wearing for date night! (Nine times out of ten he didn’t even know I was wearing a new top until I told him – “oh, but the black shirt you wore last time looks the same?”) Buying new clothes for each event you go to, whether it’s a wedding or a night down your local pub is unnecessary, and it can also be pretty hard on your bank account. Instead, I highly encourage you to buy (sometimes higher priced) sustainable clothing pieces that you can wear over and over again. The main aim of stopping fast fashion in it’s tracks is to simply buy less clothing, and love/wear what you have.

Buy items with minimal (or no) man-made fabric content. Have you ever been shopping and seen a fairly suspicious girl snooping through the rail of jumpers, reading the labels tucked inside? No? Well you haven’t seen me shopping! It may seem a little strange at first, but looking at clothing tags to see what an item is made of is so eye-opening, and I can guarantee you’ll be shocked at how many items are made out of 100% polyester. *More than 70 billion barrels of oil are used worldwide each year to manufacture polyester, which is then processed into low quality clothing items. Polyester clothing items are then not bio-degradable, and even washing these pieces causes huge pollution. It’s thought that items made with man-made fabrics, such as polyester and acrylic, are the biggest cause of microplastic pollution in our oceans today. That means it’s bigger than pollution caused by plastic bags, plastic packaging and plastic straws!
*Information from EcoCult – this article is a great read.

Aim to buy items of clothing that already go with items you own, and can be re-worn for years to come. I read (possibly in a magazine article, or another blog?) that we should be aiming to buy items we can wear at least thirty times, but I think we can do even better than that. Generally speaking we all have favourite items in our wardrobes – whether it’s a pair of jeans, a snuggly jumper or a silk slip dress – so we should be buying with intentions of working with what we already have. If you’re already shopping with a purpose like I mentioned above, this will begin to come naturally, and you start to keep yourself in check whilst you’re browsing the rails. Next time you feel the need to shop, I’d encourage you to analyse your wardrobe, and see what (if anything) you require to get more wear out of your favourite pieces. Everyone’s basics and essentials are different, so tailor this towards your own wardrobe and needs. Make time every now and then to try on different pieces together and create new outfits, I guarantee there are so many outfit options in your current wardrobe you’ve never even thought to put together before.

Take care of your clothing. Washing your clothes less frequently (especially anything made with man-made fabrics) reduces wastage going into oceans. I’m not saying you have to put the same stinky gym leggings on four days in a row, but hear me out. Lots of clothes do not require washing after just one wear; for example, jeans can be worn at least half a dozen times! This is something I have to admit was new to me last year, I would wear a t-shirt for an hour or so whilst doing our grocery shop, then put it straight into the laundry basket when I took it off. Being more eco-friendly does not compromise cleanliness! It’s also much more beneficial for the environment to hang your clothes (or lay flat) to dry, instead of using a tumble drier. I’d recommend investing in a cashmere comb – it may be the most boring yet best thing I’ve ever bought – as you can de-bobble your old jumpers in an instant. Fixing clothes that are damaged, eg sewing buttons back on or mending holes, is something I think we all need to be held more accountable for.

Research, research and research. Are you feeling intrigued and want to know more? To begin, I’d recommend reading articles, scouring Instagram, watching documentaries and looking at your own current habits. I unsubscribed from all fast fashion websites that were sending me daily emails, and I downloaded an app called Good On You, which has changed how I see brands! (It rates clothing and accessories companies on three areas – Labour, Environment and Animal. Matt and I check their information on brands whenever we’re shopping!) One thing that surprised me a little is that the more I’ve read, and the more people I’ve found who think similarly to me, my need for change has filtered through to beauty products and food. I’ve vowed to buy only makeup and skincare from cruelty-free brands moving forward, I’m beginning to explore natural and organic beauty products, and I’m enjoying experimenting with vegetarian/vegan food options more and more. I’m so excited to see where I can go on my journey to sustainability!

Thank you so much for reading, I’m so excited to hear your thoughts on this topic. Are you on your own journey to living more sustainably? Did you find this post helpful, or do you feel inspired to change? Who inspires you? I can’t wait to share some of my tips and opinions on being sustainable in all aspects of our lives over the next few weeks!

 -G x